Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Webinar: Integrating dynamic vegetation models with bird abundance models to identify priorities for avian conservation and habitat management

Abstract: Managers and decision makers recognize that successful climate-smart conservation strategies must focus on a broad range of future scenarios that represent and anticipate changes in climate, habitat types and species assemblages. Past attempts to model changes in bird habitat distributions relied on statistical models of vegetation change under climate change scenarios. While these statistical models fit present-day vegetation biogeography well, they assume that current vegetation are in equilibrium with climate, fail to account for non-analog climates in the future, and provide little insight into mechanisms of change under climate change scenarios. Dynamic general vegetation models (DGVM) simulate mechanisms of vegetation response to climate, which increase our confidence in estimating vegetation response to non-analog climate. However, the coarse spatial resolution of DGVM output presents a barrier for use in simulating avian habit distributions. We developed a methodology for combining the coarse DGVM projections with a finer-scale statistical distribution models to generate projections of future bird distributions across Oregon and Washington. The DGVM-based approach produces projections of avian habitat distributions that are markedly different from those relying on statistical correlations alone. The DGVM-based avian habitat projections expand the set of future conditions for managers to contemplate. We demonstrate how land managers can view and explore the results on an interactive website, to make climate-smart conservation decisions.

Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us) and John Rothlisberger (jrothlisberger@fs.fed.us)

Speakers:
Dr. John Kim
Biological Scientist,

Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Center & PNW Research Station, US Forest Service

Dr. Leo Salas
Senior Scientist,
Climate Change & Quantitative Ecology, Point Blue Conservation Science

Date: Thursday, April 26, 2018
Time: 2 p.m. Eastern/1 p.m. Central/ 12 p.m. Mountain/11 a.m. Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: Dial-In: 800.768.2983, access code: 8383462
Step 2: Web Login: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/18tqyjwu8enno&eom


Friday, March 9, 2018

Webinar- A Fish's Eye View: Snorkeling Freshwater Streams in the U.S.

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies’ 
Wildlife Viewing and Nature Tourism Working Group
2018 Webinar Series


Date: April 17, 2018
Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EDT

Description: We often perceive that there isn’t much to see beneath the surface of our nation’s freshwater rivers and streams, but once we look underwater, an amazing world appears. Fish of incredibly diverse colors, shapes and behaviors live in freshwater ecosystems. The streams themselves create otherworldly, breathtaking streamscapes, giving humans willing to submerge themselves the opportunity to witness incredible ecological feats such as thousand-mile fish migrations, predator-prey interactions, or the vibrant colors of mating displays. The underwater world of our rivers and streams is unexpected, largely unnoticed and amazing! They are thriving aquatic communities, composed of subjects intimately tied to one another and to humans through an aquatic matrix.

Snorkeling establishes powerful connections between people and rivers, and is one of the most intimate interactions we can have with a river, experiencing the movement and organisms of a moving water body on its own terms. Snorkeling allows us to bond with subjects that are intertwined in these aquatic communities, granting us new perspectives and reasons to care about the importance of clean water. The ways in which rivers, and the creatures that live in them, are woven into our cultural and natural heritage become apparent.

Join underwater naturalist Keith Williams and share his adventures of exploring and discovering the underwater world of our nation’s rivers and streams. Keith will discuss how to establish successful river snorkeling programs to encourage fish watching.

Connection:
Join the webinar at fwc.adobeconnect.com/
wildlifeviewing (sign in as guest, with first
and last name, no password required).
Conference call audio: 888-670-3525
Participant code: 835-369-4269

Download the Flyer Here.


Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and partners seek nominations for Climate Adaptation Leadership Awards


Nominations due by April 13
  

The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and its members and partners are seeking nominations for the Climate Adaptation Leadership Award (Award) which recognizes outstanding efforts to increase the resilience of America’s valuable living natural resources and the many people, businesses and communities that depend on them.

The Climate Award Leadership Award was established in 2016 to recognize exemplary leadership by individuals, agencies, businesses and other organizations to reduce impacts and advance adaptation of the nation’s vital natural resources in a changing world.

Previous Award recipients for 2016 and 2017 have been recognized for outstanding leadership in resource management, science, education, training and other goals of the National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy.

Nominations will be accepted until April 13. Individuals, groups, organizations, and government agencies are eligible to apply. Five to seven Awards (and Honorable Mentions) are expected to be announced in September 2018.

Fish, wildlife, and plant resources provide billions of dollars in economic activity, millions of jobs, and many other important benefits and services to Americans every year including food, clean water and air, building materials, storm protection, tourism, and recreation. The Award recognizes efforts to reduce impacts and sustain these valuable living resources and the many businesses and communities that depend on them every day.

Led by the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and its Climate Change Committee, the Award is given out each year in collaboration with federal and state government partners including the USDA Forest Service, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and others.

For more information about the Award or how to apply, please visit the Climate Adaptation Leadership Award web site: https://www.wildlifeadaptationstrategy.gov/award.php.

The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies represents North America's fish and wildlife agencies to advance sound, science-based management and conservation of fish and wildlife and their habitats in the public interest. For more information about the Association, please visit: https://www.fishwildlife.org




Friday, February 9, 2018

Webinar Series: Marine Protected Area Management and the Role of Federal Agencies, States and the Public

Hosted by AFWA’s Ocean Resources Policy Committee


Please join us this Tuesday, February 13th , from 2-3:30ET for the third and final installment in the AFWA webinar series on U.S. marine protected area (MPA) programs. Tuesday’s webinar will be focusing on MPA Programs at the Department of Interior.

Each webinar in this series will feature presentations on individual federal agency MPA programs and will discuss legal authorities, program objectives, designation processes, management approaches, relationships with state governments, stakeholder engagement and public involvement. The webinars will be formatted to allow for interactive discussion and questions with the federal agency representatives after each formal presentation. Please see the attached invitation and below for more information how to join the discussion!

In the event you were not able to join us for the first two webinars in this series you may view them by following the links below:

MPA's 101

Marine Protected Area Programs at NOAA

Upcoming Webinar: Marine Protected Area Programs at DOI

February 13th, 2:00-3:30 ET

Presenters:
Samantha Brooke - Coastal & Marine Team Lead, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Pete Leary - Marine Program Coordinator, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Cliff McCreedy - Marine Resource Management Specialist, Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, National Park Service.

This webinar will include presentations on coastal and marine National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges and Marine National Monuments.


How to Join:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2029254650788729858

After registering via the link above, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Please feel free to forward the information about this webinar series to any of your colleagues who may have an interest in this topic!

Contact Devin DeMario (ddemario@fishwildlife.org or 202-838-2562) with any questions or concerns.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Job Announcement- Open Recruitment for an Adaptation Program Manager

We're Hiring!! Open recruitment for an Adaptation Program Manager.


Position Title
: Adaptation Program Manager

Position Location: Washington, D. C.

Reports To: Science Advisor

Job Type: Exempt / full-time

Salary: Commensurate with experience. Please include salary expectations in cover letter.

AFWA Background: The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, founded in 1902, represents North America’s fish and wildlife agencies. It promotes sound management and conservation, and speaks with a collective voice on important fish and wildlife issues. The Association is a nonprofit, 501(c)(6) trade association. See www.fishwildlife.org for more information.

Position Summary: The Adaptation Program Manager manages the Association’s programs and activities related to climate adaptation, providing leadership in managing national efforts to develop and implement practical climate adaptation strategies for fish, wildlife and habitats.

Duties: Manage and facilitate a collaborative partnership of government agencies, academia, industry, and NGOs which is developing and implementing climate adaptation activities for the benefit of fish, wildlife, and habitats, as outlined in the “National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy” and the State Wildlife Action Plans.

Provide staff support for the AFWA Climate Change Committee and its affiliated subcommittees and working groups, including monthly conference calls and in-person meetings. Help advance the work of state fish and wildlife agencies (including marine resource agencies) and partners for climate-ready fish and wildlife management.

Produce and distribute a regular e-newsletter, the “AFWA Climate Change Round-Up,” to AFWA members and partners.

Facilitate the administration of an annual “Climate Adaptation Leadership Award for Natural Resources,” in partnership with state and federal agencies and the AFWA Climate Change Committee.

Create and facilitate the development of a “community of practice” among climate adaptation professionals at state and federal agencies through regular communications such as webinars, workshops, special conference sessions, conference calls, training sessions, and other learning and networking opportunities.

Represent AFWA on the steering committee overseeing the annual “Climate Academy” course at the National Conservation Training Center.

Represent AFWA at national conferences and meetings of committees and working groups that are focused on natural resource climate adaptation.

Other duties as assigned.

Qualifications: Outstanding written and verbal communications skills; strong organizational and people skills; experience facilitating diverse multi-stakeholder groups; ability to work independently and as part of a team; prior experience working in a fast-paced office environment; excellent understanding of climate change and climate adaptation as related to wildlife or natural resource management; knowledge of wildlife and natural resource management as currently practiced in the United States; understanding of the role that state fish and wildlife agencies play in conservation.

Education: Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science, Environmental Policy, Conservation Biology or related field; Master’s degree preferred.

Travel: 10% of time (~6-12 trips per year).

Desired Work Experience: At least 5 years’ relevant work experience in fish or wildlife conservation; experience working in a state, provincial, or federal wildlife or natural resource agency in the United States or Canada a strong plus.

Application Process: Please submit a letter of interest and CV to John Lord, Director of Operations at  jlord@fishwildlife.org. Applications must include salary expectations.


Application Deadline: Wednesday, February 21, 2018, or until a suitable candidate is found.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Webinar: A Vulnerability Assessment Tool (“SAVS”) to Evaluate Species Response to Environmental Stressors Including Climate Change

Due to the government shutdown, we are unfortunately postponing the AFWA – U. S. Forest Service webinar on species vulnerability assessments which had originally been scheduled for Wednesday, January 24th.   We will post a new announcement about this webinar once it has been rescheduled.

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies


Abstract: Species’ response to disturbances are often difficult to assess, especially where such disturbances have large scale and interactive impacts. Climate change represents a major challenge for wildlife management because its impacts are ubiquitous but also likely to vary across diverse landscapes. Further, individual wildlife species exhibit a range of coping mechanisms and sensitivities to climate related change in habitat and biotic communities challenging attempts to predict impacts. Vulnerability assessments provide a method for developing relevant information that can help wildlife managers identify priorities for actions that may reduce impacts. The System for Assessing Vulnerability of Species (SAVS) to climate change was developed as a tool that would quantify species’ vulnerability to climate and related disturbances. SAVS is easily implemented using expert knowledge or literature and provides scores that indicated overall species vulnerability to expected changes. The SAVS system also identifies the primary ways in which a species might be affected by climate related changes in habitat, physiological limitations, phenology, and biotic interactions. This information is critical to efforts to identify potential intervention points. During this presentation, I will describe SAVS and discuss its use in several wildlife management assessments for federal and State planning efforts.

Dr. Megan Friggens
Research Ecologist
U.S. Forest Service
Research & Development
Rocky Mountain Research Station

Wednesday, January 24
3 p.m. Eastern/2 p.m. Central/ 1 p.m. Mountain/12 p.m. Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: For audio, dial: 1-800-768-2983, and use access code: 8383462
Step 2: Web Login: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/11qsccjgfyg4a&eom

Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us) or John Rothlisberger (jrothlisberger@fs.fed.us)

Download the flyer here.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Webinar Series: Marine Protected Area Management and the Role of Federal Agencies, States and the Public

Hosted by AFWA’s Ocean Resources Policy Committee

Please join us this Thursday, January 11th,  from 2-3:30ET for the second installment in the AFWA webinar series on U.S. marine protected area (MPA) programs. Thursday’s webinar will be focusing on MPA Programs at NOAA.

Each webinar in this series will feature presentations on individual federal agency MPA programs and will discuss legal authorities, program objectives, designation processes, management approaches, relationships with state governments, stakeholder engagement and public involvement. The webinars will be formatted to allow for interactive discussion and questions with the federal agency representatives after each formal presentation. Please see the attached invitation and below for more information how to join the discussion!

In the event you were not able to join us in December for the first webinar in this series titled MPA’s 101, you may view it by following this link.


Marine Protected Area Programs at NOAA

January 11th, 2:00-3:30 ET

Presenters:
Matt Stout, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Heather Sagar, NOAA Fisheries
Kim Texeira, Office for Coastal Management

This webinar will include presentations on National Marine Sanctuaries, Marine National Monuments, National Estuarine Research Reserves and MPAs managed by NOAA Fisheries.

How to Join


After registering via the link above, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Please feel free to forward the information about this webinar series to any of your colleagues who may have an interest in this topic!


Contact Devin DeMario (ddemario@fishwildlife.org or 202-838-2562) with any questions or concerns.

Friday, December 8, 2017

Webinar Series: Marine Protected Area Management and the Role of Federal Agencies, States and the Public

Hosted by AFWA’s Ocean Resources Policy Committee

Please join us for a webinar series on U.S. marine protected area (MPA) programs. Each webinar will feature presentations on individual federal agency MPA programs and will discuss legal authorities, program objectives, designation processes, management approaches, relationships with state governments, stakeholder engagement and public involvement. The webinars will be formatted to allow for interactive discussion and questions with the federal agency representatives after each formal presentation. Please see the attached invitation and below for more information on upcoming opportunities and how to join the discussion!


Marine Protected Areas 101

December 14th, 2:00-3:00 ET

Presenter:
Lauren Wenzel,  Director
U.S. National Marine Protected Areas Center
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (bio attached)

This webinar will provide an introductory overview from the National Marine Protected Areas Center to the nation’s MPA programs, including the definition of an MPA, and the different federal, state and partnership programs that manage MPAs.

How to Join


After registering via the link above, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


Please feel free to forward the information about this webinar series to any of your colleagues who may have an interest in this topic!


Contact Devin DeMario (ddemario@fishwildlife.org or 202-838-2562) with questions.


Monday, December 4, 2017

Statement from the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Supporting the Introduction of the Chronic Wasting Disease Management Act

The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies supports the introduction the Chronic Wasting Disease Management Act of 2017 (H.R. 4454). This legislation would authorize critical funding to state and tribal agencies responsible for wildlife management to implement surveillance, monitoring and management strategies to address Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Representatives Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and Representative Ron Kind (D-WI) introduced the legislation on Tuesday, November 21, 2017.

“Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease that affects members of the deer family, and may be one of the biggest challenges in modern wildlife conservation history,” stated Virgil Moore, President of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and Director of Idaho Fish and Game. “This legislative package, if passed, will move forward and strengthen state and tribal chronic wasting disease management strategies by providing critical funding to help protect our nation’s wildlife.”

“The Association strongly supports this important legislation,” said Executive Director Ron Regan. “The state fish and wildlife agencies stand ready to work cooperatively with their state, federal and other conservation partners to address this serious wildlife health issue.”

Specifically, the CWD Management Act will:
  • Authorize critical funding to state and tribal agencies responsible for wildlife management to implement management strategies to address CWD.
  • Direct the U.S. Department of Agriculture to make grants to expand and accelerate applied research on CWD.
  • Directs the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Interior to work cooperatively with the states to conduct research and implement state CWD response plans to reduce the spread and prevalence of the disease.

Check out AFWA's press release here.


Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Webinar: Quantifying the Economic Contributions of Fish & Wildlife Habitat Management

Presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies

Abstract: The presentation will illustrate currently existing opportunities for the economic valuation of wildlife and fish management. This will include a description of how agencies and partners are well-positioned to apply concepts from economists to inform natural resource management decision-making, enhance reporting, and gauge whether agencies are meeting changing public demands. We will touch on the many challenges state and federal agencies face in trying to articulate social values, despite overwhelming public support for parks, forests, monuments and wildlife areas and a substantial amount of relevant economic research. We will share some tangible U.S. Forest Service products as models for the conservation community, and will have time to discuss how agencies and partners can collaborate to bring about a comprehensive economic narrative.

Presenter:
Jonas Epstein
Economic Research Fellow
U.S. Forest Service
National Forest System
Washington, DC

When:
Monday, November 6, 2017
1 pm EST/12pm Central/11am Mountain/10am Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: For the Audio: Dial-in: 800.768.2983, access code: 8383462
Step 2: For the Slide Presentation: Web login: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/1db9ke77n0be6&eom

Monday, October 2, 2017

Climate Academy 2018

Training Announcement: Climate Academy ALC3193
Natural resource and conversation professionals are tasked with understanding climate change impacts and using this knowledge in making decisions. This 8 week online course is designed to cover the fundamentals of climate science, provide an overview of tools and resources for climate adaptation, and increase climate literacy and communication skills. The course is designed to encourage networking among conservation professionals engaged in the management of fish, wildlife, habitat and cultural resources and provides participants an opportunity to interact with experts as they address case studies across multiple habitat types.

Beginning in January 2018, a webinar session with leading experts in these topics, will be held every week for 8 weeks, for a total of 8 sessions. There is a break the week of February 5th. Pre-webinar assignments, class resources and discussion forums will be accessed through Moodle, a distance learning platform (no special software required). Course participants will then develop a final product addressing climate change in their management of natural resources.

Objectives

  • At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  • Explain the scientific basis of climate change.
  • Understand biological impacts of climate change.
  • Understand the role of vulnerability assessments and select decision support tools.
  • Identify principles and tools of adaptation planning and examples of adaptation action.
  • Effectively communicate climate change impacts to co-workers, stakeholders and management.
  • Demonstrate how climate change integrates into their work.

Date
Webinars: Jan 10th 2018 - March 7th 2018
Break: week of February 5th
Wednesdays 1:30 -3:00 PM Eastern
Final project: due no later than March 23, 2018

Length
An estimated 3hrs/week will be spent towards participation in in lectures, discussions, and to complete reading assignments. Additional time for the final project will vary.

Location
Online

Who Should Attend
Natural resource and conservation professionals. Course is suitable for individuals or group participation.

College Credit
One semester hour is available on request.
CEUs are available through TWS.

Tuition
Tuition is $200.00
There is no tuition for FWS or NPS.

To Register
Register online at: http://training.fws.gov
NOTE: Please disregard the number of available seats. You will be notified via email concerning your enrollment status.
Registration closes October 27, 2017

Availability
Course offered annually.

Contact for Registration Questions
Jill Del Vecchio at (304) 876-7424 or
jill_delvecchio@fws.gov

Contact for Content Questions
Ashley Fortune at (304) 876-7438 or
ashley_fortune@fws.gov

Friday, August 25, 2017

Webinar: Dispersal Hazards of Pseudogymnoascus destructans by Bats and Human Activity at Hibernacula in Summer

A Webinar Presentation with:

Anne Ballmann, DVM, PhD
Wildlife Disease Specialist, USGS-National Wildlife Health Center


Wednesday, August 30th, 2017, 2:30 PM Eastern Time

To Participate in the Webinar:
Step 1: Dial-In for the Audio: 1-800-768-2983; Use Access Code: 8383462
Step 2: Web Login for the Video: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/1o8mcagbdhff0&eom

Abstract: Bats occupying hibernacula during summer are exposed to Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), and may contribute to its dispersal. Furthermore, equipment and clothing exposed to cave environments are a potential source for human-assisted spread of Pd. To explore dispersal hazards for Pd during the nonhibernal season, we tested samples that were collected from bats, the environment, and equipment at hibernacula in the eastern US between 18 July–22 August 2012. Study sites included six hibernacula known to harbor bats with Pd with varying winter-count impacts from WNS and two hibernacula (control sites) without prior history of WNS. Nucleic acid from Pd was detected from wing-skin swabs or guano from 40 of 617 bats (7% prevalence), including males and females of five species at five sites where WNS had previously been confirmed as well as from one control site. Analysis of guano collected during summer demonstrated a higher apparent prevalence of Pd among bats (17%, 37/223) than did analysis of wing-skin swabs (1%, 4/617). Viable Pd cultured from wing skin (2%, 1/56) and low recapture rates at all sites suggested bats harboring Pd during summer could contribute to pathogen dispersal. Additionally, Pd DNA was detected on clothing and trapping equipment used inside and near hibernacula, and Pd was detected in sediment more readily than in swabs of hibernaculum walls. Statistically significant differences in environmental abundance of Pd were not detected among sites, but prevalence of Pd differed between sites and among bat species. Overall, bats using hibernacula in summer can harbor Pd on their skin and in their guano, and demonstration of Pd on clothing, traps, and other equipment used at hibernacula during summertime within the WNS-affected region indicates risk for pathogen dispersal during the nonhibernal season.

Forthcoming paper in Journal of Wildlife Disease: http://www.jwildlifedis.org/doi/pdf/10.7589/2016-09-206?code=wdas-site

Webinar: Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fish and Fisheries: Global, North American, and Management Perspectives

Hosted by AFWA’s Climate Change Committee and Fisheries and Water Resources Policy Committee

Join us for a webinar featuring research from the USGS’s National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center. The presentation will cover documented and projected effects of climate change on inland fishes and proposed opportunities for adaptation. The speakers will draw from two important publications including “Global synthesis of the documented and projected effects of climate change on inland fishes” and “Climate change effects on North American inland fish populations and assemblages”.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017
1:00-2:00pm EST

Speakers
Abigail J. Lynch, USGS, National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center
Bonnie J. E. Myers, USGS, National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center

How to Join
Click here to join the meeting: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/1rj4v71g7w74m&eom
Dial-In Number: 800.768.2983, enter Access Code: 8383462
Contact Davia Palmeri (dpalmeri@fishwildlife.org or 202-838-3464) with questions.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Webinar: Overview of the Animal Welfare Act and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs)

Abstract: The USDA Animal Welfare Act (AWA) is the federal law initially written to pertain to animals used in biomedical research but which has been amended in recent years to include animals in wildlife research. Institutions involved in wildlife research have established Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) to ensure compliance with the AWA. The US Forest Service is amongst several federal and state wildlife agencies that have established IACUCs and have realized the benefit for their research scientists. This webinar will review the requirements of the AWA and its regulations, help to understand key terminology and where to find informational resources, explain the role and responsibilities of the IACUC, and discuss perspectives on determining when/if IACUC oversight is needed in wildlife research and other wildlife activities to ensure ethical use of wildlife resources and to promote distribution of scientific knowledge.

Speaker: 
Dr. Patrice Klein
Attending Veterinarian, USFS IACUC; and National Program Lead, Fish & Wildlife Health, U.S. Forest Service Research & Development- Washington Office

Date: Tuesday, August 29,
Time: 2 PM Eastern 1 PM Central 12 PM Mountain 11 AM Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: For the audio,
Dial: 800.768.2983,
Access code: 8383462
Step 2: Web Log-in: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/18dryus51iu0d&eom

Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us)
and Nicole Zimmerman (nzimmerman@fs.fed.us)

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Webinar: What Natural Resource Managers should know about Genetic Technology Terminology & Techniques to Understand the Consideration of Value verses Risk

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Association of Fish & Wildlife
Agencies.

Abstract: New gene editing techniques have arisen recently (e.g. CRISPR/CAS9), with many possible applications in fish and wildlife management and conservation. These new approaches have shown considerable potential in areas such as invasive species control, wildlife disease management, and imperiled species recovery. However, there are also significant challenges for state and federal agencies in determining how, when and whether to apply these new technologies. To help prepare you for any discussions, we provide you here with an explanation of terms, techniques in use, and what some scientists and managers are asking. Examples will be given based on ongoing work with the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, which causes White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats.



Dr. Daniel Lindner
Research Plant Pathologist
U.S. Forest Service
Research & Development
Northern Research Station




When: Thursday, July 27, 2 p.m. Eastern/1 Central/ 12 p.m. Mountain/11 a.m. Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: For audio, dial: 800.768.2983, access code: 8383462
Step 2: Web Login: https://cc.callinfo.com/r/1wifnrle7whdo&eom

Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us) and Nicole Zimmerman (nzimmerman@fs.fed.us)

Download the flyer here.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Wind & Wildlife Workshop

Week of October 9, 2017
National Wind Technology Center
Broomfield, Colorado

This is a classroom and field based workshop held at NREL’s National Wind Technology Center1 in Broomfield, CO2, where attendees will learn about current techniques for studying the impacts of wind turbines on bats, grassland birds, and raptors. Expert instructors will lead discussions topics including:

  • Pre-construction surveys
  • Post-construction fatality monitoring
  • Fatality estimators
  • Thermal and near-infrared videography
  • Impact reduction strategies and mitigation options

Attendees will gain hands-on experience using these techniques and field equipment at actual wind turbines. In addition, attendees will get practical experience using the latest software to estimate bird and bat fatalities. The workshop agenda, registration, and hotel information will be distributed by mid-July. For immediate notification once this information is available, email Rebecca Patterson (rpatterson@batcon.org) to be added to the Wind and Wildlife Workshop email list.

Registration is open to anyone who is interested. This workshop will help individuals plan projects, implement field methods, interpret reports, and better understand wildlife and wind energy issues. The diversity of participants and instructors will provide multiple perspectives related to these issues.

The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies has set aside funds to provide for registration, airfare, hotel and per diem for state fish and wildlife biologists. If you are interested in attending and need funding for travel, please contact Davia Palmeri (dpalmeri@fishwildlife.org; 202-838-3464).

Click here to download the flyer.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Webinar: Ranchers and Beavers- Social Aspects of Beaver-related Watershed Restoration in Western Rangelands

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies:

Abstract: This research focuses on the Great Basin and investigates how to create a socially enabling
environment for using beaver-related restoration approaches to restore incised stream channels, improve in-stream habitat for fish, enhance riparian habitat for wildlife, and promote climate change adaptation on western rangelands. These approaches include installing artificial structures that mimic the effects of beaver dams in streams and encourage beavers to take over, and undertaking habitat
restoration that causes beavers to naturally colonize an area. The research considers factors
such as the perspectives of ranchers who own private lands or graze on public lands where the restoration activities are to occur; the costs and benefits of beavers and beaver dams to ranchers; how to mitigate potential costs to them; regulatory and policy restrictions that make restoration challenging; and incentives to promote conservation and restoration activities. It is one example of the kind of research we could do to address the question of how to create a more socially-enabling environment for habitat restoration and conservation projects more broadly.

Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us) and Nicole Zimmerman (nzimmerman@fs.fed.us)

Presenter:
Dr. Susan Charnley
Author of Stitching the West Back Together: Conservation of Working Landscapes
Research Social Scientist, U.S. Forest Service Research & Development
Pacific Northwest Research Station

Date: Tuesday, June 27, 2017,
Time: 2 p.m. Eastern/1 Central/ 12 p.m. Mountain/11 a.m. Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: For audio, dial:
800.768.2983, access code: 8383462

Step 2: Web Login:
https://cc.callinfo.com/r/1c4cwvkexcjji&eom

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Partners with the BAND Foundation

Washington D.C. (May 4, 2017) - The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies is pleased to announce a partnership focused on fish and wildlife health, in collaboration with Bat Conservation International, the Amphibian Survival Alliance, the Amphibian and Reptile Conservancy, the Center for Invasive Species Prevention, and five universities in the United States.

Disease is rapidly emerging as a major threat to wildlife globally. While wildlife diseases are not new, human actions are dramatically increasing their spread and impact. The partnership between the BAND Foundation and the Association will lead to more effective responses to emerging wildlife diseases.  Three specific emerging pathogens that affect bats (White-nose syndrome (WNS)), salamanders (Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal)) and sea stars (Sea Star Wasting Disease (SSWD)) are of immediate concern in the United States. These families of animals play vital roles as ecosystem engineers across a range of habitats from agricultural landscapes to forests to intertidal zones. This project provides funding for critical research and monitoring to better understand the diseases that threaten them, aims to catalyze a public policy framework for tackling wildlife disease more broadly and strategically, and seeks to leverage additional dollars to address this critical issue.

“State fish & wildlife agencies are on the front lines of wildlife disease prevention. This much needed funding will go a long way to prevent and prepare for disease outbreaks through the United States,” said Nick Wiley, President of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies.

A conference to bring together experts in science and management of various wildlife diseases will be convened in 2018, to help further identify needs and improve communication and responses.

Funding for this collaborative effort was provided by the BAND Foundation, a charitable foundation whose mission includes conservation of wildlife and plant species and combatting wildlife diseases.


For more information about this new partnership, please contact Priya Nanjappa (202.838.3463/pnanjappa@fishwildlife.org) or Jonathan Mawdsley (202.838.3462/jmawdsley@fishwildlife.org).

Monday, April 24, 2017

Trapping Matters Workshop

Workshop held at the Western Association of Fish & Wildlife Annual Conference

The Association will be hosting a “Trapping Matters Workshop” during the WAFWA Annual Conference in Vail, Colorado on Saturday, July 8, 2017.  “Trapping Matters” is a professional development workshop that qualifies participants for 7 hours of credit with The Wildlife Society. Participants will be instructed in how to use proven key messages for effective communication about trapping with the media and public.  Participants are also given hands-on instruction in the use of commonly used trapping devices and provided with sound scientific information about trapping and furbearer management.  For registration or questions contact: Bryant White at bwhite@fishwildlife.org

Citizen science team monitors a deadly fungus threatening amphibian communities in northern California

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies:

                                              
Abstract: Citizen science projects increasingly are making important contributions to conservation science. Most citizen science projects solicit opportunistic reports of observations from the general public. However, the need for targeted and standardized citizen science sampling schemes has been recognized. In this webinar, we will share a case study in which the USFS Pacific Southwest Research Station partnered with an invested volunteer group to conduct citizen science to answer a specific conservation question. We discuss why and how the partnership between research scientists, state agencies, and citizens was successful at creating important research and educational products, while also maintaining participant motivation through education, enjoyment, and societal contribution. We partnered with the McKinleyville, California “EcoClub” to assess the distribution and prevalence of the
deadly amphibian disease chytridiomycosis, or “chytrid fungus”, among amphibians of public lands in Humboldt County, California. EcoClub youth and supervising family members comprised a multigenerational (4 to 74 years old) and multiethnic (39% Latino, Native American, or African-American heritage) citizen science program that reflected the local community structure. The team’s objectives were to use citizen science to understand the status and distribution of the fungus within local amphibian communities and to evaluate whether citizen science with children could be an effective strategy for conducting viable research on a significant wildlife disease problem such as chytridiomycosis. From May 2013 to April 2015, the EcoClub conducted 29 sampling trips and collected skin swabs from 230 amphibians of eight of species. The team’s results were recently published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases and demonstrated that children are effective samplers and that an energized team of citizens can make a difference for conservation science.

Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us) and Nicole Zimmerman (nzimmerman@fs.fed.us)

PRESENTER
Dr. Karen Pope
Research Wildlife Biologist
U.S. Forest Service Research & Development
Pacific Southwest Research Station

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017 2 p.m. Eastern/1 Central/ 12 p.m. Mountain/11 a.m. Pacific

To join the webinar:

Step 1: For audio, dial: 800.768.2983, access code: 8383462

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Webinar - Solar with Monarch Habitat: a Win-Win in the Land of Milkweed and Honey

Thursday April 6, 2017  
Webinar: 2:00-3:00 Eastern (1-2 PM Central)


Solar with Monarch Habitat: a Win-Win in the Land of Milkweed and Honey with Eric Udelhofen (OneEnergy Renewables) and Rob Davis (Fresh Energy). Register here!

This webinar will discuss the science and safety of photovoltaic solar and the growing trend of planting pollinator habitat under and around ground-mounted solar panels. In 2016 alone, nearly 2,500 acres of solar sites in Minnesota and Wisconsin were seeded with millions of native flowers and grasses including black-eyed susans, side-oats grama, purple prairie clover, butterfly milkweed, and calico aster.

Eric Udelhofen, development director from OneEnergy Renewables, will discuss site selection for large-scale solar arrays, including existing land use, utility interconnection, topography and other environmental factors. He will give an overview of what the development process looks like, discuss construction and provide insight into what an installation actually looks like.

Rob Davis, of 501(c)3 nonprofit Fresh Energy, will discuss its work in collaboration with the University of Minnesota Bee Lab, Monarch Joint Venture, the Gund Institue for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont, and others to establish standards as to what constitutes “pollinator friendly solar.” Rob will delve into the history of how pollinator-friendly solar was imported from the UK, where it is a common practice. Rob will outline how Fresh Energy and Audubon Minnesota built a bipartisan coalition of support for a statewide standard for vegetation on solar sites, including support from prominent agricultural legislative leaders and advocacy organizations.

Rob and Eric will both discuss the public and environmental benefits provided by pollinator-friendly solar sites as well as standard practices of pollinator meadow management on solar sites, and will describe some of the benefits to solar project owners over the long-term, including reduced maintenance expenses, improved stormwater infiltration, and greater community acceptance.

Register here!

Webinar: Long-term Research to Document Effects of Elk, Nutrition, and Predation on Mule Deer Populations

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies


Abstract: Mule deer recruitment and populations in much of the western United States have declined over the past 2-3 decades or longer. We initiated long-term research at the USDA Forest Service Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (Starkey), northeast Oregon, to understand causes for decline and gain knowledge for reversing trends. Our research is based on a planned experimental reduction of the elk population at Starkey to determine the effects of competition with elk on mule deer and the potential interactive effects of predation. Objectives are to determine body condition scores of adult female mule deer, monitor pregnancy and twinning rates, and estimate survival of juvenile and adult female mule deer in the presence of a relatively high population density of elk and in response to predation by 4 carnivores. After the elk population within Starkey is reduced by 50-75%, we will measure the same mule deer parameters. We will develop maps of nutritional resources available to mule deer to determine if they are using the landscape in an optimal manner or are restricted from high quality resources through competition with elk. We are estimating carnivore densities and diets within and adjacent to Starkey to identify the effect of carnivores on mule deer populations. Results will address major knowledge gaps for management of mule deer in forested systems of the Interior West where elk co-occur at moderate to high densities, and where multiple species of carnivores prey on both ungulate species.

Mike Wisdom
Research Wildlife Biologist
U.S. Forest Service
Research & Development
Pacific Northwest Research Station

Darren Clark
Project Lead
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Mary Rowland
Research Wildlife Biologist
U.S. Forest Service
Research & Development
Pacific Northwest Research Station

Additional Collaborators: Oregon State University, University of Nevada-Reno, and University of Idaho

Monday, April 3, 2017
2 p.m. Eastern/1 Central/ 12 p.m. Mountain/11 a.m. Pacific
To join the webinar:
Step 1: Dial-In: 800.768.2983, access code: 8383462

 Contacts: Monica Tomosy (mstomosy@fs.fed.us) and Nicole Zimmerman (nzimmerman@fs.fed.us)

Friday, January 20, 2017

Statement from the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Regarding U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director’s Order 219

Washington D.C. (January 20, 2017)- The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies expresses utter dismay with the release of Director’s Order 219, Use of Non-Toxic Ammo and Fishing Tackle, by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) on January 19, 2017. Association President Nick Wiley states that "this action flies squarely in the face of a long and constructive tradition of states working in partnership with the Service to effectively manage fish and wildlife resources.” He adds, "the Association views this Order as a breach of trust and deeply disappointing given that it was a complete surprise and there was no current dialogue or input from state fish and wildlife agencies prior to issuance. It does a disservice to hunters and anglers, the firearms and angling industries, and the many professionals on staff with the USFWS who desire a trusting and transparent relationship with their state partners." This is unacceptable federal overreach into the states’ authority to regulate the methods of take for sport fish as well as complete disregard for the states’ concurrent jurisdiction with the Service for the management of migratory birds. Further, the economic impacts of this action, which likely will be felt most by rural Americans, is likely to be hundreds of millions of dollars." The Association looks forward to working with a new Administration in the redress of this poorly timed and executed decision.



###


The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies represents North America’s fish and wildlife agencies to advance sound, science-based management and conservation of fish and wildlife and their habitats in the public interest. The Association represents its state agency members on Capitol Hill and before the Administration to advance favorable fish and wildlife conservation policy and funding and works to ensure that all entities work collaboratively on the most important issues. The Association also provides member agencies with coordination services on cross-cutting as well as species-based programs that range from birds, fish habitat and energy development to climate change, wildlife action plans, conservation education, leadership training and international relations. Working together, the Association’s member agencies are ensuring that North American fish and wildlife management has a clear and collective voice.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

National Conservation Leadership Institute Fellowship Applications



The National Conservation Leadership Institute (NCLI) will begin accepting nominations for its Twelfth Cohort on February 1st, 2017 from state fish and wildlife agencies and the conservation community nationwide. 

In today's rapidly evolving world, organizations face unprecedented challenges that demand professionals with extraordinary leadership skills. NCLI was designed by multiple conservation groups ten years ago to address that demand. Today numerous organizations realize the value of the program, sending employees year after year. Following the world-renowned principles of Adaptive Leadership™, NCLI helps high-achieving conservation professionals learn advanced, adaptive problem-solving skills; establish life-long, high-trust relationships across organizational boundaries; and foster meaningful dialogue among the diverse voices that collectively represent conservation in America.
We encourage you to submit up to three nominations from your agency to compete for one of 36 spaces in this world class leadership development program. Final selection is highly competitive so begin your internal recruitment now.
As always, applicants to the NCLI must be nominated by their agency director. Nominations will be accepted February 1 until April 30, 2017. Please visit www.conservationleadership.org for further information on the nomination process, or contact Amanda Myers at 304.876.7797.

Staff Contact: Amanda Myers; amandam@matteam.org

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Webinar: Integrating Climate Change into State Wildlife Action Plans

When: Wednesday 7 December 2016, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: Integrating Climate Change into State Wildlife Action Plans
Speakers: Sally Ann Sims, Karen Terwilliger, and Amanda Shearin


For more information and to register, go to:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to providing access to this webinar for all participants. Captioning is provided. Please direct all requests for accommodation needs to John Ossanna,  304-876-7476, john_ossanna@fws.gov , TTY 800-877-8339 at least three business days in advance of the event.


If you have any questions regarding the Safeguarding webinar series, please contact: John Ossanna,  john_ossanna@fws.gov or Tara Edwards, tara_edwards@fws.gov

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Webinar: Assessing surveying methodologies to address information gaps for forest carnivores in the Pacific States

Webinar presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies


Title: Assessing surveying methodologies to address information gaps for forest carnivores in the Pacific States

When: Monday, November 14, 2016
Time: 1 p.m. Eastern/ 12 p.m. Central/ 11 a.m. Mountain/ 10 a.m. Pacific

To join the webinar:
Step 1: Dial-In: 800.768.2983, access code: 8383462

Abstract: In partnership with government agencies and industrial land owners, we surveyed a vast landscape in Oregon and Washington in under two years, targeting coastal Pacific marten (Martes caurina humboldtensis) and fisher (Pekania pennanti) - both petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act. Obtaining reliable estimates of distribution, population size, and habitat use of rare, wide-ranging mammals is often the first step in species conservation. A wide range of protocols have been applied in the western United States for carnivores, however, most are targeted at a single species, potentially failing to detect multiple species of interest. Recent research suggests a single method, such as just using remote camera surveys, may fail to detect a species when it is in fact present. In actively managed landscapes, reliable data on rare species is often an urgent conservation challenge because land managers may have obligations to conserve rare species for ethical, ecological, or legal reasons. We used remote cameras and scent detection dog teams to assess distribution and identify potential populations, and we combined remote cameras, live-trapping, GPS telemetry, and spatial mark-resight models to rapidly assess density and land use of one isolated population of each species. Preliminary results suggest that survey methodology can affect detections, and thus apparent results. Our data combined with recent literature suggest careful consideration is needed for carnivore monitoring using non-invasive survey methods.
In addition to fisher and marten, we detected 26 other species, and have evidence to suggest some carnivores were more likely to be detected at non-baited trail cameras. Although both species were not federally listed, extant populations may experience threats such as habitat fragmentation and loss, disease, road mortalities, and poisoning, and are also subject to legal harvest in the case of the marten. These wide ranging carnivores would benefit from a strategic multi-agency strategy focused on applied research, management, and restoration across land ownerships. The combination of results from these projects taking place through 2018 are expected to assist partners with best practices to: (1) conduct efficient survey techniques for wide-ranging elusive species, and (2) understand the scope to which these data could inform management actions.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Webinar: Converting Your Guides to Digital Formats: Stretching Your Dollars and Your Reach

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies’ 

Wildlife Viewing and Nature Tourism Working Group- 2016 Fall Webinar Series

Converting Your Guides to Digital Formats: Stretching Your Dollars and Your Reach


Dec. 13, 2016  * Noon – 1:00 pm EDT
Converting wildlife viewing guides into digital formats such as eBooks (Kindle) and iBooks (Apple) is worth the time and money, and will help you reach a more digitally-oriented audience of all ages. Using a consultant will help make the process easier and will quickly pay for itself. The third of Florida’s four Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail guides became available as an eBook for Kindle (and the free Kindle app for smart phones) earlier this year, and sales have already outstripped requests for printed guides. Whitney Gray, Andy Wraithmell and Ann Marie Tavares will talk about the process, costs, design considerations and potential rewards for going digital.

Whitney Gray, Coordinator, Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail
Whitney Gray is the coordinator for the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail, a program of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Whitney has a bachelor’s degree in zoology, and a master’s degree in environmental engineering sciences with an emphasis on systems ecology, both from the University of Florida. She is a fifth-generation native Floridian who was introduced to wildlife viewing as a child and has worked in Florida’s saltmarshes, wetlands, and now in the hills and rivers of north Florida. As coordinator of the GFBWT, Whitney oversees the physical and informational infrastructure of the Trail and works to promote it as a tool for conservation and economic development.

Andy Wraithmell, Information Specialist III
Andy is the information specialist for the wildlife viewing section of the FWC. He has a bachelor’s degree in social science from Florida State University. Andy is originally from Liverpool, England and moved to Tallahassee in 2004. He spends most of his free time exploring the wild lands of the Florida Panhandle with his family and dog. In his role as information specialist, Andy manages the social media pages for the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail, coordinates the Wings Over Florida bird and butterfly programs, and coordinates events and festivals.

Ann Marie Tavares, Art Director
Ann Marie is the art director for the FWC. A 20-year, award-winning veteran in the field of graphic design and bio-illustration, she has certification in commercial art and illustration. Ann Marie currently divides her time between working with the FWC and as an equine specialist for an equine clinical psychologist. She is currently working on a master’s in clinical mental health counseling and hopes to engage clients in experiential therapy with an outdoor conservation focus. A native Floridian, she enjoys spending time viewing wildlife, fun with family and friends, playing guitar, working with her horse…and FSU FOOTBALL!

Connection:
Join the webinar at fwc.adobeconnect.com/wildlifeviewing
(sign in as guest, with first and last name, no password required).
Conference call audio: 888-670-3525
Participant code: 835-369-4269

Download the flyer here.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Webinar: Integrating Climate Change into State Wildlife Action Plans

Register today for our next webinar!


Topic: Integrating Climate Change into State Wildlife Action Plans

When: Wednesday 9 November 2016, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

Time Zone: (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Integrating Climate Change into State Wildlife Action Plans

Speakers: Chris Burkett, Amy Staffen, Ryan O'Connor, & Shari Koslowsky

For more information and to register, go to:
https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e6m9wneirnh/event/event_info.html

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to providing access to this webinar for all participants. Captioning is provided. Please direct all requests for accommodation needs to John Ossanna, 304-876-7476, john_ossanna@fws.gov , TTY 800-877-8339 at least three business days in advance of the event.


If you have any questions regarding the Safeguarding webinar series, please contact: John Ossanna, john_ossanna@fws.gov or Tara Edwards, tara_edwards@fws.gov

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Webinar: Integrating Climate Change into State Wildlife Action Plans: An Update




Topic: Integrating climate change into state wildlife action plans: an update

When: Wednesday 5 October 2016, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM, Eastern Time 

Description:
Climate change has emerged as a significant threat to fish and wildlife across the United States. As such, over the past few years, state fish and wildlife agencies have been actively working to integrate climate change into their revised State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAP). This webinar will highlight general ways in which states have addressed climate change in their respective plans, as indicated through a recent survey conducted by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA). The program will also highlight the approach applied by Tennessee, which engaged state fish and wildlife experts and both governmental and NGO partners to assess the vulnerability of species and habitats in the state and identify potential management options. The webinar will allow for opportunities for participants to share their own experiences with addressing climate change in relevant fish and wildlife management and identify next steps to ensure that the creative and innovative ideas developed by states will be implemented.

For more information and to register, go to:
Space is limited!





Friday, September 23, 2016

Webinar: Texas Nature Trackers Program

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies’Wildlife Viewing and Nature Tourism Working Group2016 Webinar Series

Texas Nature Trackers Program

October 11, 2016 
Noon – 1:00 p.m. EDT

Description: The Texas Nature Trackers Program is using iNaturalist to engage the naturalist community and to help document the persistence of species on the landscape in Texas. In less than four years we have compiled over 85,000 observations of plants and animals. Our top data priority is to detect populations of Target Species to support research and conservation efforts by the Wildlife Diversity Program at Texas Parks and Wildlife. Our outreach efforts are intended to enrich the experience of naturalists in three ways; achievement, knowledge, and impact. At its heart, iNaturalist is a community-driven platform where the interactions between observers help sustain the engagement of observers. Each observation requires validation from the community to become “research grade.” This validation provides positive and educational feedback on species identification for the observer. Texas Nature Trackers also promotes challenges, such as the Herps of Texas Big Year, or the Spring Turtle Challenge. We hope to improve the structure of these challenges to promote a greater conservation awareness, and to focus the attention of the community on data gaps and research priorities. We believe that a well-designed engagement strategy will simultaneously increase the value of the data and enrich the experience of the observer.

Presenter: Cullen Hanks, Texas Nature Tracker Biologist in the Wildlife Diversity Program at Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Connection: Join the webinar at fwc.adobeconnect.com/wildlifeviewing (sign in as guest, with first and last name; no password required).
Conference call audio: 888-670-3525

Participant code: 835-369-4269

Video: Oversight Hearing on the Status of the Federal Government's Management of Wolves




House Committee on Natural Resources
Streamed live on Sep 21, 2016

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations 
Oversight Hearing on the Status of the Federal Government's Management of Wolves


Click here to view!

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Nick Wiley Elected 2016-2017 President of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies

Washington D.C. (9/15/2016) - The membership of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies today elected Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, as its new president during AFWA's 106th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

In accepting AFWA's presidency, Wiley reflected on the critical importance of the two recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Sustaining America’s Diverse Fish and Wildlife Resources including the Recovering America's Wildlife Act and strengthening the relevancy of fish and wildlife agencies. These efforts represent the biggest conservation initiative of our respective careers.

“I am deeply honored to serve our colleagues and partners in this role as AFWA President at a time when we need strong collaboration and partnerships more than ever,” said Nick Wiley, Executive Director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and 2016-2017 AFWA President.  “While we are fortunate to have abundant populations of fish and wildlife for anglers, hunters and wildlife watchers to enjoy, we are facing a crisis with many species that are becoming imperiled on our watch. While we are all working as hard as we can to help these species, our basic model for conservation funding at the state level is not sufficient to turn this troubling tide. AFWA is well positioned to help support a new awakening to the great value and relevancy of fish and wildlife conservation, and I pledge a full measure of energy and enthusiasm to this worthy cause.”

Wiley urged his colleagues to actively tell the great story of how conservation is successfully delivered by dedicated fish and wildlife resource professionals across North America. He also praised the coordinating action and capability of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and the regional fish and wildlife agencies' associations; recognized professionals across the country for their tireless dedication to conservation; and he held a moment of silence for those fallen heroes who lost their lives in the line of duty in 2016.

Wiley will serve as AFWA President through September 2017.

"Nick Wiley is a true leader and a conservation visionary who will leave a lasting imprint on our organization," said Dave Chanda, Director of New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife and the 2015-2016 President of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. "He understands the vital role played by state and provincial wildlife managers in the conservation of North American species and habitats, and we are confident President Wiley will excel at representing both fish and wildlife conservation professionals and the North American species we hold in trust."
 

Nick is a Certified Wildlife Biologist employed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) as  Executive Director. He has over 30 years of professional experience in fish and wildlife conservation, mostly in Florida, and has served as a field biologist and in a leadership capacity in various FWC programs including alligator management, small-game management, conservation lands management, and agency policy and administration. Nick has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology from Georgia Southern University and a Master of Science Degree in Wildlife Science from Auburn University. He is a Fellow of the National Conservation Leadership Institute and a professional member of the Boone and Crockett Club.